Thermaltake MAX 5G External HDD Enclosure Review

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 950 WindForce 2x Overclocking Edition

Article Index

I’m not a big fan of “The Cloud”. Even the name makes my senses tell me it’s a bad idea. “Cloudy”…. marked with indistinct masses or streaks. Really not the type of environment I want my information living in. Yet, I am still constantly barraged by online storage offers. Why, exactly, are all of these companies pushing so hard to be the one who stores my information? There are now complete operating systems living in the cloud. That’s right, just log in and you have your complete OS and all of your files right there from any computer. Nice idea, but the prospect of spending cash on a quick computer in order for it to run an OS over the internet…..yeah, not so much.


What is a viable alternative enabling you to take your files, or even your entire OS and desktop, with you wherever you go? Well, how about an external HDD? Once seen as mainly a backup/storage device, these enclosures can now speed along on USB 3.0 with transfer rates similar to having the drive installed directly. Since almost all current systems are able to boot by USB, you can take your OS with you pretty much anywhere with no side effects of slow transfer rates.


The Thermaltake Max 5G 3.5” HDD Enclosure offers a solution to data and OS portability. Offering 5Gbs USB 3.0 transfer speeds along with SATA III capability, the Thermaltake Max 5G offers portability along with all of the speed one would expect from an internal HDD. The Max 5G is also the first external HDD enclosure offering the superior cooling capabilities of twin 80mm fans. These fans also offer a little eye candy with glowing blue LEDs which are selectable on or off accenting a sleek black enclosure design. The Thermaltake Max 5G is, of course, backwards compatible to USB 2.0/1.1, as well as SATA II/I. The Thermaltake Max 5G also offers quick and easy installation to go along with rock solid build quality.




  • ASUS Strix 7.1 Headset Review +

    Sometimes you really need to ask yourself “what’s in a name?”. Seeing a name like Sennheiser, Beyer Dynamics or Grado Read More
  • Killing Floor 2 - NVIDIA FleX Technology +

    Killing Floor 2 - NVIDIA FleX Technology If you ever played the original Killing Floor, you know that it was one game that would be considered an Read More
  • XFX Radeon R9 390X Double Dissipation Core Edition Review +

    XFX Radeon R9 390X Double Dissipation Core Edition During my career I have probably made this statement over a thousand times. “Motherboard and video card partners take the Read More
  • MSI Z170A Gaming M7 Motherboard Review +

    MSI Z170A Gaming M7 Motherboard The hardest part of reviewing computer hardware is not the testing, it’s not even the deadlines. Over the years, it Read More
  • EVGA GeForce GTX 950 FTW Edition Video Card Review +

    I can remember the days gone by when I was budget gamer. Not so much for the reason of cash Read More
  • EVGA Z170 FTW Motherboard Review +

    EVGA Z170 FTW Motherboard It all depends if you choose to be clean shaved or you like the gruffness of the 5 o’clock shadow. Read More
  • Gigabyte GA-Z170X-Gaming 7 Motherboard Review +

    GIgabyte GA-Z170X-Gaming 7 Motherboard Everyone’s looking for change or are they? Obama promised change and that change seems to have set us back 50 Read More
  • Thermaltake Pacific W1 CPU Block Review +

    Thermaltake Pacific W1 CPU Block Thermaltake doesn’t come to the minds of many people when they think of custom loop components. CLCs, sure, Tt has Read More
  • EK Waterblocks Supremacy EVO CPU Block Review +

    EK Waterblocks Supremacy EVO CPU Block Micrometers exist for the sole purpose of measuring very small distances, hence the “micro” being used as a prefix. Many Read More
  • Intel Core i7 6700K "Skylake" Processor Review +

    Intel Core i7 6700K Back to school, yea. Increased traffic during the morning commute, teachers putting on their makeup while crossing all four lanes Read More
  • 1